Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mississippi River, Escape, Alabama, Slave, Murder


Adventures of Huckleberry Finn also called The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a novel by Mark Twain, published in the United Kingdom in 1884 and the United States in 1885. The book’s narrator is Huckleberry Finn, a youngster whose artless vernacular speech is admirably adapted to detailed and poetic descriptions of scenes, vivid representations of characters, and narrative renditions that are both broadly comic and subtly ironic.

Huck runs away from his abusive father

Huck runs away from his abusive father and, with his companion, the runaway slave Jim makes a long and frequently interrupted voyage down the Mississippi River on a raft. During the journey, Huck encounters a variety of characters and types in whom the book memorably portrays almost every class living on or along the river. As a result of these experiences, Huck overcomes conventional racial prejudices and learns to respect and love Jim. The book’s pages are dotted with idyllic descriptions of the great river and the surrounding forests, and Huck’s good nature and unconscious humor permeate the whole. But a thread that runs through adventure after the adventure is that of human cruelty, which shows itself both in the acts of individuals and in their unthinking acceptance of such institutions as slavery. The natural goodness of Huck is continually contrasted with the effects of a corrupt society.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876)

Together with Twain’s novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Adventures of Huckleberry Finn changed the course of children’s literature in the United States as well as of American literature generally, presenting the first deeply felt portrayal of boyhood. It is a classic of American realism both for this portrayal and for Twain’s depiction of the pre-Civil War South, primarily through his use of dialect. This realism was the source of controversy that developed concerning the book in the late 20th century. Despite Huck’s friendship with Jim, the book was felt to be racist by some who considered the language offensive. Nevertheless, the publication in 2011 of a bowdlerized version of the novel generated debate and was considered by many to be every bit as unacceptable as the original.

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